Date

Bae: to like something or perhaps a significant other. Or literally, you can say “I like coffee” or “coffee is my bae”…or maybe the guy that changes your oil is your “car bae”. 

breadcrumbing: stringing someone along with flirty texts. This happens a lot. So I’ve heard. 

catfishing: when an online profile is fake or false. Sometimes it’s part of a scam. 

cuffing season: the cold season, often called winter, where people decide to temporarily have a mate. The latin root of the word would be “handcuffing”. 

deep like: when you scroll through someone’s profile (this could even be on Facebook) and “like” very old photos — on purpose or accidentally. This makes it obvious you spent some serious time stalking their site. 

Divorced: I’m just mentioning this because many people use this word before they are actually divorced. Ask for details if you want to know the details. 

DTR: “define the relationship”. When you have the talk about how to label what’s going on. (Don’t confuse this with DTF…down to …..)

ghosting: when you have been talking (or possibly more) to someone and suddenly they don’t respond at all. 

hat fishing: when someone wears a hat in every photo to conceal their baldness. 

IRL: “in real life”. Like….this is all fun online but let’s meet in real life. I can’t really imagine anyone over 40 using this acronym IRL. 

LFF, LFWB, LTR: “looking for fun” “looking for friend with benefits” “long term relationship”- 

sapiosexual: someone attracted to intelligence, a vast vocabulary, a high SAT score. 

swipe right: this refers to indicating interest in someone on certain dating apps. Usually it’s swipe right if you like them, swipe left if you don’t. 

sliding into DM’s: I LOVE this phrase and use it often (upsetting my kids each time). This is a way to contact someone and potentially flirt online. DM is direct message. You can even do it on Facebook or Instagram. It’s private, as opposed to commenting on a photo where everyone can view your interaction. 

submarining: this is a term for when a ghost (someone that stopped all contact) suddenly reappears with no apology and acts like no time has passed. Think “narcissist”. 

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